Morals & Ethics

From One South To Another

From One South To Another

The last time I was in Korea, I said to myself that I had to leave and then come back. That was the only way I could improve the experience; there were too many roadblocks ahead of me from where I stood that time. So I left and went home to the U.S., where I have spent the last three years. And now, in a great paradox, in order to move ahead in my own country, with my Korean bride beside me, I have to leave the U.S. for a while in order to return.

This is beginning to feel like a recurring theme in my life, running away to return again. Yet it is the fact of this age we live in. It is a reflection of the absurdities of modern civilization and the very unsustainability of it for the average person who has not resources nor connections to smooth over or bypass the obstacles put between them and their living.

Art in the Age of Empire

Art in the Age of Empire

What then remains within our own power?  We have our opinions, reactions, and attitudes, as Epictetus notes, but I would say we also have art.  We all have the capacity for art in one form or another.  And by this I mean real art, art that is not subject to utility, obsolescence, or official approval.  It is done for its own sake, and makes its own meaning.

Yeoman, Again

Yeoman, Again

I think America today churns about in an enormous feedback loop because our societal and political foundations are not compatible with the archetypes ---- the characters, if you will ---- around which our contemporary moral discourse revolves.  Our national imagination is limited to three basic archetypes, who certainly reflect who we are, but not where we have come from, nor what we should strive for.  Those three are the capitalist, the vigilante, and the progressive politician.